Diwali
Mrunal Khimji
Mrunal Khimji • Nov 04

Diwali

by Mrunal Khimji

Diwali or Deepavali is a festival known around the world as the Indian Festival of Lights. Hindus follow a lunar calendar. Hence, the date for Diwali every year changes. Diwali takes place on the 15th day of the Hindu month of Kartik (the eighth month of the year), which typically overlaps October and November. It is the day of the new moon or Amavasya.

Hindus start their festivities four days before the actual day, praying/showing gratitude to the three different Goddesses. On the 12th day of the month, we pray to Goddess Saraswati (Goddess of Knowledge), the 13th day to Goddess Lakshmi (Goddess of Wealth), 14th Day to Goddess Kali (Goddess of Strength & motherly love). 

Diwali symbolizes the victory of good over evil, light over darkness, and knowledge over ignorance. 

Diwali symbolizes the victory of good over evil, light over darkness, and knowledge over ignorance. Hindus across the world light lamps, keeping the light of hope and positivity in our minds. 

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Hope and gratitude are the cornerstones of Diwali—to believe that there will always be light after darkness, and we only have to persevere to get to the other side. Indeed, the Sanskrit word Deepavali literally means row of light. 

As one of the biggest and most celebrated Hindu festivals, it brings people from different states and sub-castes together. The fervour of lights, colours, rangolis (decoration at the entrance of any house to welcome goddess Lakshmi), and traditional sweet delicacies is fully experienced by all during the festive season. 

The next day, people greet each other with “Sal Mubarak” (Happy New Year). The new day brings new positive desires and hope—dropping the regrets and negativity of the past and praying for a brighter future ahead. 

Diwali is one of those festivals that brings people from the world together to pray for a common cause, in spirituality, and in faith. 

Diwali is one of those festivals that brings people from the world together to pray for a common cause, in spirituality and in faith. 

This Diwali, despite the tough times the world has seen, we must remember we have survived; now more than ever, we need to hold the significance of Diwali close to our hearts. That includes being grateful for the abundance that our planet has left us with despite what we put it through. It shows us how every breath we take should be in gratitude because we do not know what happens tomorrow. 

Those celebrating Diwali, dressed in their finest, take time to meet and wish extended family and friends well. The joy of being together while decorating the house with flowers, lights, and rangolis, or cooking multiple mouthwatering staples with family, is at the core of this festival.

There are many different stories around Diwali in India.

There’s the one about Lord Rama returning to his kingdom of Ayodhya after his victory over the demon Ravana, or Lord Krishna saving his Village of Gokul by lifting the Govardhan Mountain on his finger. The story could be anything; however, the deeper meaning is the same. 

We need to keep the torch/light of hope burning inside us. That feeling should not be restricted to a day, but Diwali is an excellent place to start.  

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Mrunal Khimji
Mrunal Khimji

Mrunal Khimji is a hand embroidery specialist and fashion design consultant. Mrunal also designs vegan footwear.

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